History and
Social Sciences

The faculty and students within our multidisciplinary department advance the study and practice of history and the social sciences through teaching, research, and outreach. Our research generates knowledge rooted in historical and social scientific approaches to the study of the human condition.

Courses

Undergraduate Courses

This course examines the origins and early development of Europe from 1000-1600. Topics include the overall character and decline of feudalism, the rise of national monarchies, urbanism and society during the Renaissance and Reformation. Socioeconomic and cultural history is emphasized.
3 Credit Hours

This course provides a study of the political, intellectual, and social history of early modern Europe from 1500 to 1815, with emphasis on the institution of monarchy and on the reigns of famous kings and queens. Attention will also be given to the major transformations of the age including the scientific, English, and French Revolutions and their effects.
3 Credit Hours

A basic survey and introduction to the field of American history, this course conveys the political, cultural and economic development of the United States through Reconstruction. It provides an understanding of the foundation of the "American way of life".
3 Credit Hours

A history of the American experience from the end of Reconstruction to the present, this course focuses on the Urban-Industrial age, the rise of the United States to world leadership, and the important changes that have occurred in the "American way of life" during the past century.
3 Credit Hours

In this course students survey American women's history from colonial times to the present. The course shows how the major social, political, and economic developments in American history have affected women in the past. Students examine the lives of "ordinary" women, as well as those of leading women thinkers and activists.
3 Credit Hours

This introductory survey course traces the development of humanity and society from the dawn of history to 1500, and provides insight into the wide spectrum of ideas, institutions, and life practices that different people and cultures around the world have created. Various representations of "civilizations" and "community" are considered.
3 Credit Hours

An historical study of the major regions and cultures of the world during the last five centuries, with attention to their connections and interactions and to the development of global trends. Political, economic social, intellectual, and cultural factors will be considered, and special emphasis will be placed on the emergence and the challenges of the people of the "third world". One theme will be an analysis of the processes of "modernization". This course is cross-listed with GLOB 271.
3 Credit Hours

This course is a basic survey of Latin American history from before the European invasions to the recent past. The course emphasizes both the diversity of the Latin American experience across time and space and the persistence of certain historical continuities in the region: intense political and cultural conflict, deep social and economic inequality, and longstanding domination by externally-based imperial and neo-imperial powers.
3 Credit Hours

The course requires students to formulate and support coherent arguments about complex historical problems in class discussions, essay exams, and writing projects. It strengthens students' global perspective by encouraging historical analysis of selected current world events and the U.S. relationship to/involvement in those events. By introducing students to historical methods and theory it enables them to understand more deeply one of the key disciplines associated with the humanities. This course is required for history majors and concentrators.
3 Credit Hours

This course introduces students to key themes, concepts, and debates in American Studies. Students use a foundation in American Studies methodology to interpret a range of materials and develop a richer understanding of the United States, its cultures, and its peoples. Objects of study may include literary texts, films, historical documents, music, visual art, and products of popular culture. Specific course topics may vary. This course is cross-listed with LCS 282.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level history course

This course examines the major political, economic and intellectual developments since 1815. It emphasizes the significant events, patterns, and themes in Western history within the context of the modern world.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level history course

This course offers a selected history of modern and post-modern themes, ideologies and values in Euro-America (Western civilization) since the Renaissance. Special emphasis is placed on analyzing social, political and philosophical questions and writings in context. The thematic focus of the course (e.g., individualism) may change from year to year.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level history course and sophomore standing

Early in 1943, Max Lerner, the well-known author and journalist, writing for the New York newspaper, PM, predicted that "when the classic work on the history of women comes to be written, the biggest force for change in their lives will turn out to have been war." This course explores the question of whether or not World War II served as a major force for change in the lives women, both in the United States and around the globe. The experiences of a broad socio-economic and ethnic cross-section of wartime women are examined. In addition to the United States, areas of the world examined include women in China, France, the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, Germany, and/or Italy.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level history course

This course examines the main contours of political, economic, social, and cultural life during the 1960's. Special areas of focus include: the Civil Rights Movement, the New Left, the Vietnam War, the antiwar movement, the resurgence of conservatism, the demise of the New Deal Coalition, the emerging women's liberation movement, the effect of social and cultural movements on business, and the intersection of artistic and cultural expressions with politics. The relationship of popular mythology and collective memories concerning the 1960's with "objective" historical analysis constitutes another key area of concern.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level history course

This course treats the history of technology in the contexts of American business and social history. Focusing on the 19th and 20th centuries, the course first places technological change within the context of larger developments in American history. From that basis, the course then moves on to deal with the impact of technology in American social institutions, business, and culture.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level history course

This course examines the origins and development of the United States as a great world power from the Spanish-American War to the post Cold War era. Focusing on the connections between international and domestic events, the course evaluates the role of the US as a global power over the past century.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 251 and 200-level history course

This course examines major issues in race relations from the perspective of both black and white Americans from the onset of slavery to the present. The course examines the origins and functioning of American slavery, with consideration to the Atlantic slave trade and the role of U.S. slavery within the context of New World slavery; the relationship between European immigrants and African-Americans in terms of the formation of whiteness and the historical meaning of white skin privilege ; abolitionism and antislavery; the development and functioning of Jim Crow segregation; 2nd Reconstruction; the civil rights movement; and the significance of race during the post civil rights era. This course is cross-listed with SOC 366, Race in America.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level history course

This course explores the historical context of various expressions of American popular culture in a variety of media, including: literature, film, radio, television, music, performance, advertising, style and fashion, food, and the internet. It examines the meaning of popular culture to its audiences and the way those audiences use and transform cultural products as part of their everyday lives. Attention is given to popular culture's relationship to "high culture," to economics and commerce, and to social and political developments including, but not limited to the emergence of working-class culture, the Great Depression, the Cold War and McCarthyism, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, and the Women's Liberation Movement.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level history course and Sophomore standing

This course provides students the opportunity to examine the cultural complexities of the 1950s and to appreciate it as a period of conservatism and restraint as well as a time of notable social change for women. It uses the enormously popular I Love Lucy television series (1951-1957) and Betty Friedan's classic work, The Feminine Mystique (1963), as well as related readings, to show how many women of the fifties challenged the stereotype of domestic, quiescent, suburban womanhood as they engaged in multifarious and diverse activities that helped pave the way for the social protest movements of the 1960s.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level history course

This course examines the history of relations between the United States and the nations of Latin America from the era of the Monroe Doctrine to the present.
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Prerequisites: 200-level history course

This course provides an historical study of the evolution of Russian society from the Age of Kiev to the present including the era of the tsars and the Soviet period. Special attention is given to the contemporary situation in Russia.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level history course

This course consists of an historical study of the ideas and institutions of the countries of East Asia with primary focus on developments in China in ancient times and in the modern era since 1800. Contemporary problems are also discussed.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level history course

This course provides background for an analysis of some of the major problems of contemporary African life. Topics include the ancient culture of Africa, the slave trade, colonialism, African nationalism, and current political, economic and social trends in Africa.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level history course

This course provides a survey and examination of Japanese history from its beginnings to the twentieth century, and includes a consideration of political, social, economic, intellectual, and cultural developments. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of Japanese traditions and values and their sources, and also on the history and practices of Japanese business. A major portion of the course will deal with the modern period and Japan's successes and failures as a modern nation.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: ECO 114 and 200 level history course

This seminar will explore the origins and evolving complexities of the enormous cultural and economic transformations that are underway in the Newly Independent States (NIS). In particular, it will carefully situate the ongoing economic transformation within a broader cultural, historical, and political context. Special emphasis will be placed on how the rapid collapse of the Soviet Union's command economy, and the resulting cuts in defense spending, have created critical problems for both the West and the Newly Independent States. This course is cross-listed with ECO 376, Cultures and Economies in Transition.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level history course

This course is a study of the ideas and the political careers of two great 20th century national leaders: M.K. Gandhi of India, and Nelson Mandela of South Africa. Attention will also be given to the modern and contemporary history of their respective nations, and especially to the social and political systems which these men tried to change.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200 level history course and sophomore standing

This course will explore in depth the Holocaust and its impact on the development of international law after 1945. Topics will include anti-Semitism, the rise of Hitler, the Final Solution, minority rights, domestic legal actions against perpetrators, the Nuremberg International Military Tribunal, Allied military courts, and subsequent national and international trials of accused Nazi war criminals. The course concludes with an examination of some of the leading post-Nuremberg topics in international human rights law today, including peremptory norms, transitional justice, hate speech prohibitions, and Holocaust denial.
3 Credit Hours

Students engage in individually supervised work-study arrangements and learn to apply history theory and principles in their work environment. Students must work at least ten hours per week on the job, meet periodically with a supervising faculty member, research literature related to the field of the internship, and prepare a substantial report on their internship experience and the studies involved. This course is limited to juniors and seniors and requires the approval of a supervising faculty member and the department chair.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200 level history course

This course examines major developments in global history since 1945, considering topics such as the capitalist and socialist world-systems, the Cold War, imperialism, and third world independence movements, and the so-called "new world order." Special emphasis is placed on the interaction between Western and non-Western societies.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level history course

In this advanced course students trace the history of Great Britain from the Glorious Revolution of 1688 to the present, concentrating on cultural history and utilizing a socio-political perspective. Themes include the development of capitalism, constitutionalism, industrialism and imperialism, and the impact of the British expressions of these forces on modern globalization.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level history course

This course presents a history of the modern natural sciences from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries, treating the development of modern physics, chemistry, geology, and biology. Students need no special background in science. The course focuses on conceptual problems and the culture of science rather than on the content of science. Examples of special topics include the development of the Newtonian world-view, the challenges of relativity and the quantum, how alchemy led to modern chemistry, why so many early geologists were churchmen, and how Darwinian evolution differed from other nineteenth-century evolutionary theories. The course is geared to the capabilities of students without specialized background in history and science.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level history course

An intensive examination of the forces and events that have shaped the recent American past, this course stresses domestic politics, social change, urbanization, civil rights and modern ecological problems.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level history course

This course explores the major political, social, cultural, and economic shifts in American life during the 1970s and the 1980s. Special areas of focus include the ascendancy of conservatism, the retreat of liberalism, rising economic inequality, women's and gay liberation, the expanding role of the media in American politics, the veneration of corporate America, and expressions of such in the era's popular (and sometimes unpopular) culture. The relationship of popular history and collective memory of the 1970s and 1980s with "objective" historical analysis constitutes another area of emphasis. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200 level history and sophomore standing

This course examines the cultural, political and military dimensions of the complicated wartime alliance between the United States and China during the World War II era. It focuses on the period from the Japanese invasion of Manchuria in September 1931 until early 1950 when the Chinese government seized the U.S. consulate in Beijing after the refusal of the United States to recognize the People's Republic of China. Students explore both primary and secondary sources as they untangle the multifaceted relationship between the United States and China during this critical era. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

For seniors concentrating in History, this seminar provides extensive, practical experience in the craft of historical research and writing. Further, it examines select themes in historiographical and/or philosophical debates concerning history as a special type of knowledge. Requirements include a substantial research paper. Permission of instructor and HIS 273 are required.
3 Credit Hours

This course is an opportunity for students to do independent, in-depth study or research for academic credit. The student works on an individual basis under the direction of a member of the history department. The main requirement of the course is the development of a substantial paper or project. Permission of department chair and faculty member is required.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level History course.

A history of race and slavery in the Atlantic World between the 15th and 19th centuries, with a particular emphasis on the economic, social, and cultural impact of the trans-atlantic trade in enslaved Africans (a crucial component of 'globalization" during that era) on the development of European-ruled societies in the Americas.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level History course.

This special topics course focuses on the role of patronage in producing the cultural heritage of Italian art and architecture. The course has two parts: First, an on-campus component that furnishes a broad history of Italy along with a more focused treatment of developments in art and architecture during key periods. Second, this course leads to completion of a student research project that may be completed during an optional field experience in Italy (8-10 days carried out during the Bryant spring break). Admission to the course is by application only.
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Prerequisites: 200-level history course.

This course will examine the history of American public education beginning with Colonial America, and the evolution of education based on the political, economic, social, and cultural changes regarding a free and equal education for all children. It will focus on the development of public education and the conflicts over class, race, religion, and gender. The second part of the course will highlight the landmark 1954 US Supreme Court ruling in Brown v Board of Education. Students will study the effects of the ruling and the legacy the case holds in contemporary America. Throughout the course, the students will examine the changes in education due to social dynamics and conflicts in terms of the struggle for access, opportunity, and equity.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: HIS 261 or HIS 262 or HIS 282 or LCS 282 and sophomore standing

The proposed course introduces students to the historical origins of public history as an academic discipline. It explores the relationship of public history to local communities, the creation of cultural memory, and the study of history within the academy. These themes will be approached through the prism of institutions such as museums, historical societies, corporations, preservation offices and other cultural resource agencies. Other topics will include educational programming, material culture and exhibit development as well as how to make local historical materials available within historical societies, museums, and manuscript repositories. Each student will work on a public history project at a local Public History institution, contributing a minimum of 25 hours of work.
3 Credit Hours

This course is an introduction to the field of global politics, also known as international relations. It focuses on a variety of interconnected topics, including the development of the nation-state system and political interactions among countries over issues of war and peace, human rights, and economic and environmental policies. We also explore the evolution and work of international institutions such as the United Nations and the World Bank, and non-governmental international organizations such as environmental and human rights groups. This course is cross-listed with GLOB 241.
3 Credit Hours

This is an introductory course about the role of U.S. government in American society. After tracing the development of the U.S. Constitution, the course surveys a range of topics including Congress, the presidency, the Supreme Court, federalism, political parties and elections, interest groups, civil liberties, and civil rights. Contemporary domestic policy debates are also covered.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: Honors Program

This honors course explores the current global political system.It examines major historical developments that shaped the actors and power distribution of the current system. Next, it explores competing international relations theories that attempt to explain the main motivations and realities guiding the behavior of actors in the system. Then, it focuses on contemporary issues with global implications. Subsequently, it examines recent and future challenges faced by particular key actors in the system as they attempt to shape the global system of the future. It concludes by returning to the system level to consider the prospects for global cultural clashes or peace through globalization. Students receiving credit for POLS 241/GLOB 241, Introduction to Global Politics, cannot receive credit for this class. This course is cross-listed with GLOB 290.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: Honors program or permission of the honors coordinator

This honors course covers the ideas and historical factors that shaped the formation and evolution of the U.S. political system. It examines the main governmental and non-governmental players in the contemporary policy-making system and how they interact to create policy decisions. It explores some key ongoing policy debates. Additionally, it goes beyond book knowledge to examine contemporary, practical politics throughout the semester. Students receiving credit for POLS 256, Government and Society in America, cannot receive credit for this class.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291

Students in this course survey the instruments, implementation and issues of U.S. foreign policy. Students will learn about America's rise to power and its current role in the world with a focus both on how foreign policy is made and Post WWII U.S. involvements overseas.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291

What is the nature of the relationships that exist between government and business, politics and economy, power and money in the United States? And why do these relationships matter? In this course, we will use these questions as a starting-point from which to undertake a critical examination of these relationships as they exist today and to consider where they might be heading in the future, and to generate conclusions about their potential implications - political, economic, and social.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291

This course covers the history of party politics, party organization, nominations and elections, voting, and the role of pressure groups, public opinion, and the media in the national electoral process. The course is offered in the fall semester of even numbered years when congressional and/or presidential elections take place.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291

This course examines the key concepts, issues, and trends in comparative politics. Comparative politics focuses on the study of political organization and behavior using the method of comparison across time and between country cases. The course covers topics such as various types of political systems, political participation, economic development, and nationalist movements/identities. Types of countries covered include: established democracies, authoritarian regimes, communist, and developing countries.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291

Students explore the social and political foundations of Latin American societies, and their contemporary political institutions and practices. This course focuses on the varying roles played by political culture, the main political actors, foreign intervention, and developmental issues in Latin American politics.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291

This course examines the political, economic, and social systems of countries in Europe. It also analyses the process of integration that has created the European Union. Some of the themes examined include varying political systems, political participation, social movements, political parties, and government social policies, as well as issues raised by sharing power between individual countries and the EU. Countries examined will include some from Western, Central and Eastern Europe.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291

After tracing the rise of Arabism and Islam, this course examines how the modern Middle East was shaped by the influence of European colonialism. It then examines recent regional conflicts and their resolution, including: the Arab/Israeli wars, the Palestinian uprising, the Iran-Iraq war, and the Gulf war.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290, or POLS 291

This course uses comparative methodology to analyze the government and domestic politics of India, China, and Japan. Students will be introduced to the political institutions and processes of the three countries, and explore the impact of history, cultural dynamics specific to Asia and South Asia, government structures and economic change on political processes. State-society relations are examined within the context of democratization, development, and citizen movements. Issues regarding cultural and scholarly lenses will be addressed through critical examination of relevant materials and theories discussed in class.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291

This course examines the intersection of global environmental sustainability issues, political policy, and the world economic issues. It focuses on different trajectories of environmental and ecological politics and thought, and on foundations for policy, with particular focus on climate change. The central premise is that deciding how to respond to climate change is a highly political process involving conflicts over competing values and interests, the growth of international institutions, and the link between climate change and the global economy.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: POLS 256 or POLS 291 or GLOB 241/POLS 241 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 and junior standing or approval of a supervising faculty member and the department chair.

Students engage in individually supervised work-study arrangements and learn to apply political science theory and principles in their work environment. Students must work at least ten hours per week on the job, meet periodically with supervising a faculty member, research literature related to the field of the internship, and prepare a substantive report on their internship experience and the studies involved.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291

The image of the presidency today as the centerpiece of the American political system is very different than the one originally outlined in the U.S. Constitution. What has brought about this change? How has this transformation impacted the separation of powers and the respective roles of Congress and the Supreme Court? What does the popular image of the president as "chief decider" signify for a democratic system of government? These questions and more guide this course's exploration of the presidency in modern American politics. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291

In this course students analyze the nature of the modern nation/state system, and the resultant struggle for power, including power politics, balance of power, and war and peace. This course covers the bases and limitations of national power as well as international law, international organization and diplomacy. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291

"All's fair in love and war" used to effectively summarize global politics, but in recent years, moral considerations have become major, but still controversial, components of many policy discussions. This course will examine issues such as the ethical constraints on the use of force, human rights norms, issues created by global inequality and by development programs, and ethical implications of the global economy and multinational corporations. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: GLOB/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291

This course examines first the conflicting political philosophies of liberalism, conservatism, and Marxism which shaped the development of Western democracies and the former Communist countries, and then considers modern ideological debates over third world nationalism, environmentalism, and feminism.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291

This course offers an integrated look at East European and Russian politics primarily for juniors and seniors. We look at Bulgaria, the Czech Republic and Slovakia, and the former "East Germany" (ex-GDR), Hungary and Poland. We also consider the Balkans including ex-Yugoslav successor states. Finally, we examine Russian domestic and foreign policy concentrating on the post-Soviet period.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291

This course examines the political, economic, and social structures of the broad array of countries in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East that make up the developing world. The major challenges faced by these countries and strategies adopted to address them will be identified and analyzed. A historical overview of the evolution of the developing world will explore the impact of colonialism and issues of post-colonialism. Issues of gender, race, ethnicity, sustainable development and the environment will also be explored.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291

This course focuses on the role of individual country governments, official international economic organizations, and globally-oriented non-governmental organizations (NGO's) in the international economic system. It examines conflict and cooperation among nations, as well as interactions between countries and international institutions such as the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization, as they engage in the management of trade, investment flows, exchange rates, debt, and the global environment. It also considers politics within individual countries as they affect that country's international economic policies, looking at governmental relations with business, labor associations and other non-governmental organizations as these impact on trade policies, exchange rates, and the regulation of multinational corporations' overseas operations.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: Politics and Law major and senior standing

This seminar is designed as an interdisciplinary capstone course for students in the Politics and Law major. It will include an in-depth examination of a selected theme in politics and law. Each student will work intensively with the instructor to complete a major research project on a topic of their choice, which will be presented to the entire seminar. This course is cross-listed with LGLS 490.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: varies by topic.

This course is an opportunity for students to do independent, in-depth study or research for academic credit. The student works on an individual basis under the direction of a member of the political science faculty. The main requirement of the course is the development of a substantial paper or project.
3 Credit Hours

This course prepares students for service learning by introducing them to key tools for community engagement, including skills and strategies for working with community partners and critical reflection for deeper understanding and personal growth. Framed within the perspective of sociology, the course includes a service learning field experience and complements any area of University study. Service learning courses at Bryant require significant out- of- class community service done in partnership with community agencies.
3 Credit Hours

Students survey and appraise the basic concepts, including theory and method, social processes and structure, culture, groups, socialization, inequality and social institutions.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: Honors Program

This course is a more advanced introduction to sociology, allowing students to explore social theory, research methods, social structure, culture, groups, socialization, social interaction, inequality, and social institutions more deeply than in the standard introductory course.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 250SL or SOC 251 or SOC 253

An exploration of major contemporary social problems, examining the context of social problems with a focus on the generation of social solutions. In this course, students select six focus areas for their study, examining the causes and proposed solutions to social problems, including inequalities in education, health, social justice, environment, criminal justice, and standards of living and development. This course is available with an integrated service-learning option (SOC 351SL).
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 250SL or SOC 251 or SOC 253

An exploration of major contemporary social problems, examining the context of social problems with a focus on the generation of social solutions. In this course, students select six focus areas for their study, examining the causes and proposed solutions to social problems, including inequalities in education, health, social justice, environment, criminal justice, and standards of living and development. Service learning takes the student into the community where he or she not only learns sociology by way of real world experiences but also assists a community organization in realizing its goals. Community partners include schools, nursing homes, hospitals, and many other nonprofit agencies. Service learning courses at Bryant require significant out of class community service done in partnership with community agencies. Students receiving credit for SOC 351 cannot receive credit for this course.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 251 or SOC 253 and SOC 250SL for service learning option

Focusing on the role that gender plays in the opportunity for health and the likelihood of illness, this course explores the causes and consequences of different health outcomes for women and men and the myths and stereotypes about each group. For example, many believe that women have higher rates of mental illness than men but what, if any, is the evidence for this view? The course is U.S. based but it will cover some cross-cultural comparisons of gender, health and illness. This course is available with an integrated service learning option (SOC 352SL).
3 Credit Hours

Good health is a foundation for healthy communities, but good health is in scarce supply. In this course, students will explore the conceptual aspects of good health as a scarce societal resource, will learn about the ways in which health and illness are experienced in sub-groups in our population, and, through community service learning experience, and understand the health and illness issues that actual groups of people cope with in their daily lives. Service learning courses at Bryant require significant out of class community service done in partnership with community agencies. Students receiving credit for SOC 352 cannot receive credit for this course.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 251 or SOC 250SL

Globalization and Childhood examines the impacts of globalization on children and childhood across the globe. Issues include children as producers and consumers, as soldiers and victims of violence, and other topics. This course is also available with an integrated service-learning option (SOC 354SL).
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 250SL or permission from the instructor

Globalization and Childhood examines the impacts of globalization on children and childhood across the globe. Issues include children as producers and consumers, as soldiers and victims of violence, and others. All students work on community-based projects as part of their academic assignments. Service Learning courses at Bryant require significant out of class community services done in partnership with community agencies.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 251 or SOC 253

The central goal of this course is to lead students to a deeper understanding of the ways in which American families are changing. Through an examination of the family in sociological, historical and cross-cultural perspective, students will gain insight into both the diversity of family forms and the ways in which the family is tied into the larger structure of society.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 251 or SOC 253 or PSY 260 and Sophomore standing

This course introduces students to the rich literature of sociological explorations into social psychology. It reviews a broad range of theoretical approaches, focusing particularly upon symbolic interactionist theory. Through readings, case studies and practical applications, students explore the intricacies of the social world to uncover a deeper understanding of human social behavior and themselves as social beings.
3 Credit Hours

This course uses the Sociological Imagination as the lens through which to analyze of the content of television. We will apply "The sociological imagination" (C. Wright Mills famous concept) to episodes of "The Wire", an HBO series that ran for five years. We will examine the lives of the characters and "urban space" as chronicled in "The Wire" including the work, neighborhoods, the city, morality, sexuality, politics, "childhood," gender and gender expression, race and social justice. We will also consider the relationship between social structures, culture, structure and agency. This course is cross-listed with COM 359.
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Prerequisites: SOC 251 or SOC 253 and SOC 250SL for service learning option

This course provides an overview of the discipline of sociology of sport. The course focuses on the global aspects of sport, with an emphasis on the relationship between sport and race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and national identity. It provides students with the theories, concepts and perspectives that allow them to better understand the relationships between sport, society and culture. This course is available with integrated service learning option (SOC 360SL).
3 Credit Hours

This course provides an overview of the discipline of the sociology of sport. Students will focus on the global aspects of sport, with an emphasis on the relationship between sport and race, class, gender, sexual orientation and national identity. This course also helps students develop theories, concepts and perspectives to understand the general relationship between the institution of sport, society and culture.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 251 or SOC 250SL or SOC 253

This course takes a sociological perspective on creativity and innovation exploring the sociological context of each. Combining readings and lectures, class activities and a community-based project, students will learn about the social context of creativity and innovation and also understand more deeply their own creative processes and strengthen these through projects and portfolio building.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 251 or SOC 253

This course examines major issues in race relations from the perspective of both black and white Americans from the onset of slavery to the present. The course examines the origins and functioning of American slavery, with consideration to the Atlantic slave trade and the role of U.S. slavery within the context of New World slavery; the relationship between European immigrants and African-Americans in terms of the formation of whiteness and the historical meaning of white skin privilege; abolitionism and antislavery; the development and functioning of Jim Crow segregation; 2nd Reconstruction; the civil rights movement; and the significance of race during the post-civil rights era. This course is cross-listed with HIS 366, Race in America.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 250SL or SOC 251 or SOC 253

This course applies sociological theory and research to the study of crime and social control. Students engage in policy debates and research projects focused on the philosophy, design and operations of the criminal justice systems in education, immigration, drug control, and other areas. This course is available with the integrated service learning option SOC 370SL.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 250SL or SOC 251 or SOC 253

This course applies sociological theory and research to the study of crime and social control. Students engage in policy debates and research projects focused on the philosophy, design and operations of the criminal justice systems in education, immigration, drug control, and other areas. Service learning courses at Bryant require significant out of class community service done in partnership with community agencies. Students receiving credit for SOC 370 cannot receive credit for this course.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 251 or SOC 253,Junior/Senior standing; approval of a supervising faculty member and department chair.

Students engage in individually supervised work-study arrangements and learn to apply social science theory and principles in their work environment. Students must work at least ten hours per week on the job, meet periodically with a supervising faculty member, research literature related to the field of the internship, and prepare a substantive report on their internship experience and the studies involved.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 250SL and Junior standing.

Students engage in individually supervised service learning arrangements in collaboration with a community partner. They must work at least twelve hours per week on the job, review literature related to the field of the internship, engage in regular and ongoing reflective activities, and produce a body of work that is of value to the community partner or site. This course is limited to juniors and seniors and requires the approval of a supervising faculty member and the department chair. Service learning courses at Bryant require significant out of class community service done in partnership with community agencies.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: ECO 214, GLOB 241, POLS 241, GLOB 290, POLS 290, PSY 260, PSY 263, SOC 251, or SOC 253 and MATH 201 or 200 level or higher course in statistics

In this course students learn the systematic strategies commonly used to gather, analyze, and interpret social science data via survey research. Students use SPSS statistical analysis software to learn the art, logic, and science of data analysis and interpretation--including establishing causality with observational data.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 251 or SOC 253

This advanced course examines the determinants and consequences of population processes and structures. Students explore the relevance of population to several social policy issues, including poverty, social security, health care, and the environment. The course uses illustrations from the United States and a variety of developed and developing countries.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 251 or SOC 253 and SOC 250SL for service learning option

The sociology of work is an exploration of the meaning of work in our lives and in our culture. The course is organized in a seminar format in which students read and discuss a series of important books in the field. In addition to guiding students toward developing their own sociological insight, the course will challenge some of their basic assumptions about the social organization of work and about the relationship between the economic and the non-economic spheres of our lives. This course is available with an integrated service learning option (SOC 452SL).
3 Credit Hours

The sociology of work is an exploration of the structure and meaning of work in our lives and in our culture. The course is presented in a seminar format in which students read and discuss a series of topical books in the field. In addition to guiding students toward developing their own sociological insight, the course will challenge basic assumptions about the social organization of work and about the relationship between the economic and the non-economic spheres of our lives. This sociological exploration of work will be organized around a service learning practicum designed each semester in collaboration with a community partner. Service learning courses at Bryant require significant out of class community service done in partnership with community agencies. Students receiving credit for SOC 452 cannot receive credit for this course.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 251 or SOC 253

This course examines and uses theories to understand the treatment and life chances of racial and ethnic subpopulations, with an emphasis on U.S. society. Students explore the many ways stereotypes, prejudice, racism, and privilege become part of our everyday interaction and reinforce institutional discrimination.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 251 or SOC 253

This seminar is first and foremost a study of classical and contemporary social theory. It also examines the ways in which a variety of these theories, both classical and contemporary, view and explain social inequalities. More specifically, we will use theories, theorists, and concepts from theories to help us better understand "isms and phobias" including racism, sexism, classism, heterosexism, homophobia, transphobia, ethnocentrism and xenophobia.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 251 or SOC 253

Because most of us have urban or suburban backgrounds, and because of the huge cities all over the globe, we assume that most of the world’s population have urban experiences. This has not the case- at least until now. The world of the future will be urban. It is important that we understand how and why cities come into being, and how urbanism affects people’s lives and behavior. Students will use urban theory to analyze the relationship between larger social forces and individual experiences in selected substantive areas of urban sociology.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 250SL or SOC 251 or SOC 253 and Sophomore standing

Social entrepreneurs create innovated solutions to the world's most vexing problems. This course provides students background knowledge in the emerging field and hands on experience in social entrepreneurship.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 251 or SOC 253 and Junior standing

Designed for student majoring in Sociology and Social Research, this senior-level capstone seminar asks students to explore, either as an individual directed-study or as part of a weekly seminar, some aspect of an important social issue as it relates to the operation of a social institution: marriage and family; religion; work; politics; urbanization; or sports.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 250SL and SOC 251 or SOC 253 and Junior standing

This capstone course requires that students apply social theory and concepts to help them understand a community experience and then use the community experience to help make the theory and concepts come alive. Furthermore, students will conduct community based research that will benefit the community service partner, utilizing and understanding the specific research methods that will allow the most exacting study of the community. It requires an engaged and intense community based service experience. Service learning courses at Bryant require significant out of class community service done in partnership with community agencies.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 251 or SOC 253 and SOC 491 and Junior standing

This course may follow SOC 491--offering the student a chance to tackle a large, in-depth study by providing a second semester to research their topic of interest.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 251 or SOC 253.

This course is an opportunity for students to do independent, in-depth study or research for academic credit. The student works on an individual basis under the direction of a member of the sociology faculty. The main requirement of the course is the development of a substantial paper or project.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 251 or SOC 253 and SOC 250SL and SOC 491SL and Junior standing

Available to advanced service learning students, this course helps to develop the practical skills necessary for assuming leadership in communities and small groups. Acting as Community Assistants and service learning mentors, students work with a community partner and lead protegee students in reflection and analysis activities. The student works on an individual basis under the direction of a member of the sociology faculty. Service learning courses at Bryant require significant out of class community service done in partnership with community agencies.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SOC 251 or SOC 253

This course examines how sexuality is defined throughout the life cycle. This course will use a sociological perspective to examine the cultural, political and legal aspects of human sexuality. Recent studies on human sexuality have highlighted that sexual aspects are of major importance in building up personal identity, social interaction and the social evolution of individuals.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing

This course emphasizes the nature of legal systems and processes. Topics include agency, contracts, the Uniform Commercial Code, debtor-creditor relationships, government regulation of business, and business structure (selection of a business entity).
3 Credit Hours

This is an introductory course to the field of legal studies. The course surveys how Western law has changed over time by looking at the historical, socioeconomic, and cultural forces that have molded--and continue to mold--both substantive and procedural law, as well as the institutions devised to decree, interpret, and administer law. Areas covered include the idea of justice, the nature of law, the basis of political and legal authority, the nature of citizenship, the foundations of international law, the legal profession, techniques of legal development through case law and codification, and other matters relevant to the structure and development of Western law. In order to pursue this inquiry, the course will trace a series of seminal "revolutions" in Western history. Each of these world-historical upheavals will be examined for their decisive impact on the unfolding of Western law.
3 Credit Hours

In this course students examine the legal principles and rules that define the nature and limits of American government and the rights of citizens under the Constitution. The course stresses analysis of Supreme Court decisions and their influence on American political and economic development.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: LGLS 211 or LGLS 220

A study of the legal rights and privileges of communications media, this course emphasizes the following topics: written communications; the problems of right to know versus right of privacy; libel, defamation, copyright, and infringement; examination of regulatory agencies; and theories of the First Amendment.
3 Credit Hours

In this course we examine the methods of governing behavior in cyberspace from the United States and a global perspective. We begin with a study of the infrastructure of the Internet and its regulation. The legal principles inherent in the First Amendment, intellectual property, privacy and commerce are examined. We then apply these traditional legal principles to activities in cyberspace.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing

There are numerous philosophies which underlie the law. They range from the view of law as morality discoverable through reason, to the perspective of law as a command by those in power. What does it mean to interpret a legal standard such as a statute or a case law? To what extent are judges legislating? Drawing connections between and among these issues will be the focus of this course.
3 Credit Hours

This course is an introduction to the field of law and society. Students examine the nature of law and what we can and cannot expect it to do for us; the manner in which law and legal categories shape society; the role of lawyers, judges and other legal actors in the legal system; the basic structure of the judiciary and how cases flow through the court system, and controversial legal issues in such areas as business, medicine, and gender. Emphasis is placed on issues that illustrate the interaction between law and social control and law and social change. The course draws from a variety of perspectives including sociology, political science, history and philosophy. A major goal of the course is to give students a practical foundation in the critical assessment of law and legal thinking as well as improving their ability to make arguments in writing and orally.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: LGLS 211 or LGLS 220

Sport acts as a prism on society. Sport can reflect and forecast changes in our society on local, regional, national and international levels. These changes and their interrelationship with Sport are studied in this class.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: Junior standing

This course will introduce students to the basic concepts and problems of international law and of the international legal system, and will cover the traditional major topics in this field such as the sources of international law, sovereignty, jurisdiction and responsibility of states, treaty law, non-intervention principles, the relationship between international law and national law, dispute resolution and international litigation. It will also address newer themes in international law such as the impact of international organizations and other "actors" in international law, human rights law, international criminal law, the use of force and terrorism, international environmental law, and the impact of religion and culture on international law. The course will review a number of important international law cases decided by both national and international tribunals, as well as treaties, resolutions and other international legal instruments of importance.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: LGLS 211 or LGLS 220 or LGLS 360 or permission of the instructor

This course explores law, governance and public policy issues surrounding the not-for-profit segment of the US economy. It concerns the life cycle of various forms of not-for-profit entities recognized and regulated by the United States Code and otherwise, e.g. USC Section 501(c) Corporations: Trusts; Private Foundations and Mutual Benefit Societies, from formation to dissolution, examining the (relative merits of the relevant structures as well as the respective) duties and liabilities of directors, officers and employees. Through readings in legal and management texts, questions of public policy and the ethics of special privileges these entities enjoy in American society are examined.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing

This course investigates how law regulates health and affects the health care industry, health care practitioners, patients, scientists, and other stakeholders. Each semester the topics included in the syllabus vary depending on what is currently debated. A list of topics for a past semester includes infectious disease, privacy, quarantine, FDA regulation, clinical trials, direct-to-consumer advertisement, medical tourism, reproductive health, rationing, abortion, end of life, and others.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200 level History course and sophomore standing

This course will explore in depth the Holocaust and its impact on the development of international law after 1945. Topics will include anti-Semitism, the rise of Hitler, the Final Solution, minority rights, domestic legal actions against perpetrators, the Nuremberg International Military Tribunal, Allied military courts, and subsequent national and international trials of accused Nazi war criminals. The course concludes with an examination of some of the leading post-Nuremberg topics in international human rights law today, including peremptory norms, transitional justice, hate speech prohibitions, and Holocaust denial.
3 Credit Hours

Legal Studies internships give students the opportunity for supervised employment in an area where they can apply legal studies theories and principles. Interns work at least ten hours a week, meet periodically with a supervising faculty member, do research on their field of employment, and prepare a substantive report on work experience and research. Approval required by a supervising faculty member and the department chair. Junior standing is required.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: Junior standing

This course provides an advanced look at some of the provisions of the Uniform Commercial Code. Topics include contracts, sales, negotiable instruments, and secured transactions. These topics are of particular concern to those who are interested in becoming accountants.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: Junior standing

This course offers a study of the laws and regulations that govern U.S. financial institutions and the federal agencies that regulate those institutions. We analyze the creation and actions of the monetary system and capital markets. We examine the evolution of regulatory efforts and analyze current issues and challenges that face regulators and institutions going forward. In particular, we will examine the 2007-2008 meltdown of the mortgage, securities, banking and derivatives industries, and the federal actions (legislative and regulatory) undertaken in response to those crises, with a particular focus on the provisions of the Dodd Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and one 300-level Legal Studies course or permission of the instructor

Thinking deeply about the nature of "the Good" is the starting point for investigating the purposes of law. To this end, Legal Ethics introduces the student to the leading ethical systems that have guided human thought about the Good. Using examples from both U.S. and international law, the course helps the student to integrate an understanding of ethical systems and theories of moral development into the study of law broadly considered. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content level course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: LGLS 211 or permission of the instructor

This course will address both the broader issues of government control of international business and the process of doing business overseas. It will compare the unique culture and legal systems of the United States, Europe, Japan and the Middle East. In addition, the course will focus on the mechanics of doing business overseas under international agreements such as GATT, NAFTA and the European Union.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: Politics and Law major and senior standing

This seminar is designed as an interdisciplinary capstone course for students in the Politics and Law major. It will include an in-depth examination of a selected theme in politics and law. Each student will work intensively with the instructor to complete a major research project on a topic of their choice, which will be presented to the entire seminar. This course is cross-listed with POLS 490.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: LGLS 211 or LGLS 220 and permission of the instructor.

Under faculty supervision, students pursue a well defined area of interest in legal studies.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 300 or 400-level Legal Studies course.

“Corporations: Devils or Angels” is a special topic course designed to analyze, in an empirically informed way, the relationship between law and morality as well as law and the political, economic and cultural realms. The course focuses on corporations, which are legal entities created and regulated by state law: it traces their historical emergence, looks at the rights under the Constitution and examine impact of these legal entities on the economy, politics, and culture. One 300 level Legal Studies course and sophomore standing.
3 Credit Hours

Graduate Courses

Prerequisites: This course is a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required

This course explores the major political, social, cultural, and economic shifts in American life during the 1970s and the 1980s. Special areas of focus include the ascendancy of conservatism, the retreat of liberalism, rising economic inequality, women's and gay liberation, the expanding role of the media in American politics, the veneration of corporate America, and expressions of such in the era's popular culture. The relationship of popular history and collective memory with "objective" historical analysis constitutes another area of emphasis.
3 Credit Hours

This course examines the cultural, political, and military dimensions of the complicated wartime alliance between the United States and China during the World War II era. It focuses on the period from the Japanese invasion of Manchuria in September 1320 until early 1950 when the Chinese government seized the U.S. consulate in Beijing after the United States refused to recognize the People's Republic of China. Students explore both primary and secondary sources s they untangle the multifaceted relationship between the United States and China during this critical era in history. The course also examines how and why a major wartime ally became a major adversary during much of the Cold War era. This course is a 500 level graduate course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

This course is an opportunity to do independent, in depth study or research for graduate school credit. The student works on an individual basis under the direction of a member of the history faculty. The main requirement of the course is the development of a substantial paper or project. This is a 500 level graduate course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

The presidency today is widely perceived as the centerpiece of the American political system. But this notion is very different than that originally outlined in the U.S. Constitution. What has brought about this change? What strengths and weaknesses characterize the modern presidency? How has this transformation impacted the separation of powers? What does the popular image of the president as "chief decider" signify for democratic government? These questions and more guide this exploration of the presidency in modern American politics. This is a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

In this course students analyze the nature of the modern nation/state system, and the resultant struggle for power, including power politics, balance of power, and war and peace. This course covers the bases and limitations of national power as well as international law, international organization and diplomacy. This is a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

"All's fair in love and war" used to effectively summarize global politics, but, in recent years, moral considerations have become major, but still controversial, components of many policy discussions. This course will examine issues such as the ethical constraints on the use of force, human rights norms, issues created by global inequality and by development programs, and ethical implications of the global economy and multinational corporations. This course is a 500 graduate program. Permission of instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

This course is an opportunity to do independent, in depth study or research for graduate school credit. The student works on an individual basis under the direction of the political science faculty. The main requirement of the course is the development of a substantial paper or project. This is a 500 graduate level course. Permission of instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

This course is an opportunity to do independent, in depth study or research for graduate school credit. The student works on an individual basis under the direction of a member of the sociology faculty. The main requirement of the course is the development of a substantial paper of project. This is a 500 graduate course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

Thinking deeply about the nature of "the Good" is the starting point for investigating the purposes of law. To This end, Legal Ethics introduces the student to the leading ethical systems that have guided human thought about the Good. Using examples from both U.S. and international law, the course helps the student to integrate an understanding of ethical systems and theories of moral development into the study of law broadly considered. This is a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

This course is an opportunity to do independent, in-depth study or research for graduate school credit. The student works on an individual basis under the direction of a member of the Legal Studies faculty. The main requirement of the course is the development of a substantial paper or project. This is a 500 level graduate course. Permission of instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours