Science and Technology

Our dedicated faculty and quality facilities prepare students for science-related careers and graduate studies. We emphasize basic and applied research, technological applications, and international experiences because our objective is not merely to accumulate knowledge, but also to develop commitment and take action.

Courses

Undergraduate Courses

This course serves as an introduction to the fundamental principles of biology. Emphasis will be placed on topics including scientific/biological methodology, biological classification and nomenclature, cell structure and function, cellular biochemistry, principles of energy and metabolism, genetics, aspects of ecology and the core theory of modern biology - evolution. Students will gain a deeper understanding of life processes at the cellular and molecular level. This course may be taken with a laboratory to fulfill the laboratory requirement for graduation.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 251

This course is intended as a higher level biology course focusing on organismal biology, the study of structure, function, ecology and evolution at the level of the organism. It will use evolutionary theory as an organizing theme to explore biodiversity, physiology of various organism groups (plants, animals, etc.), and ecology, with human physiology especially highlighted. This course will be essential for students intending to pursue advanced graduate or professional training in biological and biomedical fields.
3 Credit Hours

This course explores the cyclicality of geologic processes that shape the earth. Volcanic activity and earthquakes contribute to the building of mountains. Rivers and oceans help to destroy mountains. This simplistic idea is expanded to give the student a very good idea of "how the earth works." This course may be taken with a laboratory to fulfill the laboratory requirement.
3 Credit Hours

This general introductory course explores the fundamentals of astronomy. All branches of modern astronomy are covered. Major topics include the historical development of astronomy, the solar system, and the universe beyond. This course may be taken with a laboratory to fulfill the laboratory requirement.
3 Credit Hours

This course deals with some areas of physics, such as mechanics, heat, waves, sound, light, electricity, and modern atomic physics, primarily from a conceptual point of view. This course will be especially useful to students who plan to enter an industry in which an understanding of the physical laws of nature is desirable. This course may be taken with a laboratory to fulfill the laboratory requirement.
3 Credit Hours

This course will provide a general knowledge of chemistry as foundational background for careers in the environmental and biological sciences, chemical, agricultural and pharmaceutical industries, energy and materials management, and community service sectors. This course provides an introductory study of the fundamental concepts of chemistry: atomic and electronic structure, chemical bonding, simple reactions in organic and organic chemistry, and chemical equilibria. This course may be taken with a laboratory to fulfill the laboratory requirement.
3 Credit Hours

The study of oceanography will provide students with an appreciation and a general familiarity with the ocean and with both coastal and open marine environments. This course will have an interdisciplinary focus in that it will emphasize the interactions that occur among the biological, chemical, geological, and physical phenomena of various marine environments from the beach to the open ocean.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 265

This course completes a two semester introductory chemistry sequence and will enhance a student's preparation for further study in the environmental and life sciences at Bryant. Recommended for students who are majors in Biology or Environmental Science and who plan to enter an industry or field of study where a general knowledge of chemistry is essential such as the health professions (medical, pharmaceutical, dental) and graduate school in the biological sciences. This course will characterize and explain chemical systems at equilibrium, as well as exploring spontaneous processes, rates of chemical reactions, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, and acid/base chemistry.
3 Credit Hours

This course provides students with a broad overview of the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships implicit in environmental studies, including the concept of sustainability, and to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made. Integrated laboratory and/or field exercises will demonstrate the principles, processes, techniques, and technologies of environmental problems and solutions.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 264

This course explores concepts in physics specifically related to the biological and health sciences, including properties of fluids and solids, thermodynamics, optics, electrostatics and DC circuits, and radiation and health. Examples will be drawn primarily from the biological world with a special emphasis on human and animal health. This course is required for students pursuing a pre-med track within the Biology major.
3 Credit Hours

Natural disasters, both local and global, are an important factor of all human societies and the weather comprises many of these disasters. This course investigates our knowledge of the weather processes that affect human environments in catastrophic ways, from tornadoes and hurricanes to climate change coverage. It includes the prediction of these phenomena as well as quantifying their impact, possible mitigation, and the politics that surround them. These concepts are presented in a way which applies to real-life and encourages critical thinking. Methods of scientific inquiry are also covered. This course may be taken with a laboratory to fulfill the laboratory requirement.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 251, SCI 262, or SCI 266 or permission of the instructor

This course provides a review of ecological principles and selected research studies underlying these concepts, identifies techniques used by ecologists, and presents an overview of local and global environmental issues, including strategies for sustainability. In addition, the course emphasizes critical analysis of environmental problems and examines individual, group and societal roles important to improving environmental quality. This course may be taken with a laboratory to fulfill the laboratory requirement.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 251

Nutrition concerns the study of processes by which organisms ingest, digest, absorb, utilize food and excrete wastes. Students will learn human diet and nutritional needs and develop the ability to think critically about nutrition claims and counterclaims in the marketplace. Recent advances in nutrition research, such as those relating to weight loss, performance enhancement, and mood control, will also be covered.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level science course

In this course students review the principles of energy transformation, explore alternative energy resources and their feasibility, and assess current and future energy policy formation. In addition, students examine the economic and ecological impacts of various policy options and provide assistance in structuring institutional management plans for efficient energy use. This course may be taken with a laboratory to fulfill the laboratory requirement.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 251 or SCI 265

Biotechnology is the commercial application of living organisms involving the deliberate manipulation of their DNA. As such, biotechnology broadly impacts commercial markets in human and animal health care, agriculture and horticulture, and the forensic sciences. Students will learn, through lectures and "hands on" laboratory experiences, about the biotechnology products and "new life forms" which have been or are about to be commercialized. This course involves significant "hands on" experiences, and focuses on the development process of bioengineered products from Idea inception to market entry. This course may be taken with a laboratory to fulfill the laboratory requirement.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 251 and Junior standing

This course will instruct students in the cultural and social legacy of sexuality in American society. Students will also learn the details of human reproduction, development, and sexual maturation and consider the impacts of new technologies on reproductive health care. Sexually transmitted diseases, their biology and social implications, will also be covered.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 251 and SCI L251 or instructor permission

The essential principles of human anatomy and physiology are explored in this course, using a systems approach. The first portion of the course will review fundamental biological and chemical principles central to life at a cellular level, and explore the structure and function of tissues. The second portion of the course will involve a detailed analysis of the structure and function of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and endocrine systems, as well as an examination of the senses. The coordination of these organ systems and their role in the maintenance of homeostasis in the human body will also be explored. The course can be taken with a laboratory to fulfill the laboratory requirement, or to prepare for application to medical or professional programs in the health sciences.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 251 or SCI 265 or permission of the instructor

This course provides an understanding of the development of modern biological sciences and covers basic biological scientific principles in major sub-disciplines such as evolution, molecular biology, physiology, and medicine. By presenting major Nobel Prize winning research in biology, the course provides insight into the unique mindsets of Nobel laureates, noting the creativity and logical reasoning behind their Nobel Prize winning research. Both social and business impacts of their scientific contributions will be discussed, with emphasis on how scientific knowledge affects politics, history, religions, and daily life.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 251, sophomore standing or permission of instructor

This course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts of genetics. The first half of the course will detail classical inheritance patterns, chromosomal rearrangement, mutations and DNA repair. The second half of the course will deal with modern discoveries and applications in today's world with respect to uses in biotechnology, genomics as well as the role of genetics in the development of disease states such as cancer. Experimental data will be incorporated into each segment of the course to enhance understanding of the scientific method and reinforce lecture topics. This course may be taken with a laboratory to fulfill the laboratory requirement.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 251 or SCI 265 or instructor permission

This course explores the biology of major plant groups-- their structure, function, physiology and ecology systematics and phylogeny. While the emphasis will be placed on flowering plants (angiosperms), the dominant plant group in the modern world, the course examines all aspects of plant life, including the impact of human activities on vegetation. The course will include direct observation of plant material and preparation of herbarium specimens. Current issues related to plant diversity, protection of endangered species, horticulture, food production, etc. will also be discussed.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 265

This course will provide an introduction to the chemistry of organic compounds and the importance of organic chemistry in our everyday life. Organic chemistry is involved in many industrial production processes such as plastics and pharmaceuticals, as well as being essential to the reactions and processes that occur in living organisms. This course will cover the structure and chemistry of the major classes of organic compounds, and is recommended for students who plan careers in environmental toxicology, the chemical and pharmaceutical industries, waste management, biological sciences and geochemistry. This course may be taken with a laboratory to fulfill the laboratory requirement.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 251 or SCI 262 or SCI 266 or SCI 287 or permission of the instructor

This course will teach the student how different types of coastlines are molded from waves, tides and sediment supply. It will also show the different tools, methodologies, and applications that are available to the coastal geomorphology assessment and surveying service industries. Group projects involve the preparation of technical/cost proposals to solve coastal geo-technical problems and design of coastal management plans.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 251 and SCI 265; or permission of the instructor

This course involves the study of chemical processes that are continually occurring within a living organism. The structures and functions of critical chemical components of all cells will be covered as well. In addition, critical processes such as metabolism, generation of energy and the biosynthesis of major biomolecules (proteins, DNA, lipids, carbohydrates) and photosynthesis will be analyzed in-depth. The final portion of the course will examine biochemical basis of disease, and how biological systems deal with toxins.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 251 or SCI 265 or permission of the instructor

This course will provide an overview of forensic science, including strategies for identifying and solving complex problems, exposure to the analytical tools used by forensic scientists, and the professional standards and ethical considerations guiding practitioners. Special topics will include the scope and history of forensic science, the use of scientific methodology, the concepts of evidence and proof, and the methodologies used for establishing unique connections based on physical, chemical and biological evidence. Students will also become acquainted with the role of histology, serology and DNA typing in forensic analyses, the importance of accurately reconstructing dynamic processes; the recognition, collection and preservation of evidence; the use of statistical techniques, and the demands for quality assurance. An introduction to the technologies used by forensic scientists will be included, along with an examination of the scope of professional careers in forensic science, especially the collage of specialties that comprise collaborative forensic teams.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 251 or SCI 265; or permission of instructor

This course will focus on the microscopic study of tissues and organs in relation to their function using light and scanning electron microscopy allowing anatomy and physiology analyses to be visualized at the cellular level. Topics will include tissue structure, organization and histochemistry, pathological variations associated with different disease states, molecular biomarkers, fluorescence technology, and immuno/cyto/ histochemical techniques. Students will use various techniques of preparing plant and animal tissue for microscopic study in the laboratory, and will gain experience in digitizing microscopic images. Additionally, methodologies including tissue processing, embedding, sectioning and staining techniques, along with analytic tools used by scientists in medical forensic, biological, and toxicological fields will be examined.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level science course

Having doubled in the last 40 years, the human population is requiring an increasing amount of natural resources while generating a substantial amount of waste and pollution that the environment can no longer absorb. It has been reported that human activities, such as land development and agriculture, have modified over 50% of the Earth’s land surface. We are also causing an extinction rate 1,000 – 10,000 times greater than the background extinction rate. This course covers environmental issues on land use, wildlife protection, and human health. Topics include toxicology, agriculture, forestry, urbanization, biodiversity decline, and sustainable solutions. Tools and techniques for problem solving and analysis will be emphasized. This course may be taken with a laboratory to fulfill the laboratory requirement.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level science course

An increase in technological advancements has degraded our air and water. For instance, acid rain has caused half the trees in Germany’s Black Forest to die; the life expectancy for urban residents in India has been reduced by 3.2 years because of air pollution; and at least 320M people in China do not have access to clean drinking water. This course covers our environmental impact on air and water, transport and fate of toxic chemicals, and current prevention efforts. Topics include global warming and climate change, urban smog, surface water and groundwater contamination, and ocean dead zones. Developing problem solving and risk assessment skills will be emphasized. This course may be taken with a laboratory to fulfill the laboratory requirement.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200 level science course

Can machines think? What does this really mean? This course provides an introduction to the topic of artificial intelligence and robotics. The lab part of the course provides hands-on experience in the making of thinking machines. The lecture part of the course will focus on the theory of artificial intelligence and robotics, but will also include some hands-on projects and competitions. The course (both the lab and lecture) will serve as an introduction to programming in Python, and the use of the robotic hardware. The course will present methods for solving difficult decision-making problems. The lecture and lab (SCI L373) must be taken concurrently. Some programming experience is helpful but is not required.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 365

This course is the second semester offering of the full year of organic chemistry. This course will expand your basic knowledge of organic chemistry by developing a deeper understanding of the reactivity of functional groups such as aromatic rings, dienes, alcohols, amines, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives. In addition, it will further your understanding of “electron pushing”, so that you are able to propose reasonable reaction mechanisms. Students will be able to use the fundamentals of functional group reactivity to develop multi-step syntheses of organic molecules. Finally, students will be able to use NMR spectroscopy, along with IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, to deduce unknown organic structures.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level science course

This course will provide an overview of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), widely used by geologists, hydrologists, oceanographers, community planners and environmental engineers, utilizing diverse computer hardware and software applications. Applications for GIS tools will be examined, including transportation design, land use planning, facility citing, and resource management. This course will focus on how GIS applications are structured, what types of mapping data can be processed, and what customized products can be generated. Case studies will illustrate the utilization of GIS analysis to improve decision making, and field visits to public and private sector data centers will illustrate the breadth of applications. Hands-on exposure to CARIS for Windows and ArcGIS will enhance the student's understanding of GIS tools and provide a means for individualized projects to be completed. This course may be taken with a laboratory to fulfill the laboratory requirement.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 265 with lab or SCI 251 with lab or permission of instructor

This course examines life at the microscopic level and is designed to provide an understanding of microbiology and its connectedness to the environment, medicine, agriculture, and industry. Topics will include exploration of the world of bacteria, viruses, protista, and fungi, use of microbes in genetic engineering, food preservation and safety, the role of microbes in biotechnology, industry, and agriculture, antibiotic resistance, viral and bacterial diseases of humans, and the use of microbes or microbial products in bioterrorism. Demonstration exercises will be integrated throughout the course to reinforce lecture topics. This course may be taken with a laboratory to fulfill the laboratory requirement.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 360, Sophomore standing, or permission of the instructor

This course is the second semester of a 2-course sequence that covers the study of the structure and function of the human body. Topics include a further exploration of essential principles in human anatomy and physiology, and are built upon the knowledge acquired in Anatomy and Physiology I. The course will proved a detailed analysis of the structure and function of the cardiovascular, lymphatic, digestive, respiratory, urinary and reproductive systems, as well as to examine human growth and development. The coordination of organ systems and their role in the maintenance of homeostasis in the human body will be examined. The course is matched with a laboratory component (Anatomy and Physiology Lab II), and is considered to be a requirement for pre-med and many pre-professional health programs.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: Junior standing and science major or permission of the instructor

This course is intended to provide an introduction to scientific methodology and analytical science. Topics will include data analysis, statistical analysis, principles of spectrophotometry, chromatography and microscopy, field sampling techniques, technical writing, and oral presentation skills. This course will serve as the foundation for the SCI 490 research project and those students interested in analytical science.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: Approval of a supervising faculty member and department chair.

The science internship provides the student with the opportunity to gain on-the-job experience and to apply scientific principles and procedures learned in the classroom in a work environment. The student is required to meet regularly with a faculty advisor, keep a daily log of activities, complete a paper or specific research project, and prepare an evaluation of the experience at the end of the internship.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: approval of supervising faculty member and department chair.

This course is tailored to fit the unique interests of a student interested in science. Faculty and student will design a program for the study of complex issues in science and/or technology, including technical applications of scientific methodology and basic applied research into existing scientific problems, including regular meetings throughout the semester. The end product of this study would be a paper describing the results of the investigation, including methodology and data that have been generated, or the equivalent.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level science course or permission of the instructor

This course is designed for both majors and non-majors who are interested in learning how biological characters and concepts are illustrated through various kinds of imaging technologies. By introducing the theoretical dimensions and the operation guidelines of biological imaging techniques, students will understand how these techniques are utilized to detect and illustrate complex biological structure and function. Through hands-on practice of these techniques, students will be guided to generate publishable images on research samples, to use proper imaging processing skills, and to incorporate the images into a scientific paper. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 251 or SCI 264 or SCI 265 or permission of instructor

This course will cover the principles behind a variety of instrumental and analytical techniques that are in use in the environmental and life sciences. The principles behind techniques such as gas chromatography (GC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), mass spectrometry (MS), infrared and UV spectroscopy, and high performance liquid chromatography will be examined. These topics will be explored in relation to their utility in answering scientific problems in the environmental and life sciences. Students will be able to develop an instrumental "toolbox" that will be coupled with a set of quantitative skills for analytical applications. The role of analytical chemistry in relation to supporting policy development and drug approval will be explored. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 251 or SCI 262 or SCI 265; or permission of the instructor

This course will explore the challenges of providing a sustainable energy supply to support increasing world population and growing economies, and will focus on global energy systems, renewable energy sources, distributed power networks, diversification of energy supply, and increased energy efficiency. By examining the energy issues that preoccupy world decision makers, such as dwindling fuel resources, deteriorating electrical grids, externalization of costs, subsidies for existing energy corporations, extreme pollution and environmental degradation associated with mining, drilling, transport, operations, and waste disposal, students will develop and international perspective and multidisciplinary frame with which to approach needed changes in direction. Innovative approaches are needed throughout the entire energy distribution system, including changes in fuel procurement, processing, usage, and cost analyses that account for the entire fuel cycle and minimization of external costs. Breakthroughs in control systems, materials management, green building technology, carbon sequestration techniques, and algal biofuel production are just a few examples of promising new avenues for energy developments that will be assessed. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 251 or SCI 262 or SCI 265 or SCI 287, or permission of instructor

This course provides background and training in the utilization of Geographic Information System (GIS) tools for tracking climate change effects on coastal ecosystems, with a particular emphasis on how coastal planners can predict the extent and likelihood of significant alterations of coastline geomorphology or ecosystem dynamics. Advance planning can reduce the impact of these changes on residents and natural inhabitants. Case studies of coastal regions around the world will be explored. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 251 or SCI 262 or SCI 266 or SCI 351 or SCI 366 or SCI 371 or SCI 376; or permission of the instructor

As one of the major environmental issues, conservation captures the attention of both scientists and the general public. National parks in the U.S. and China preserve spectacular examples of the best biological and geological resources on our planet. This course provides basic scientific information behind these natural wonders and presents and analyzes conservation issues using an interdisciplinary approach. Through reading, discussion, and lectures, students will gain insights into the critical role that national parks play in the preservation of natural resources, as well as protecting cultural and historic values. Using selected national parks as case examples, students will learn how to assess scientific data that underlies environmental debates about conservation issues, and will examine how these issues are connected to society and business. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
S

Prerequisites: SCI 251 or SCI 262 or SCI 265 or SCI 266 or SCI 351 or SCI 371 or SCI 372 or SCI 376 and junior standing; or permission of instructor

This course will present an overview of environmental policy alternatives, emphasizing the interrelationship of science, business and government in policy formation and implementation. Global issues will be included, with special attention directed toward international efforts to achieve consensus on sustainable growth policies that encompass economic realities, technological innovation and a sensible legal and regulatory framework. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level science course

The generation of hazardous wastes and our potential exposure to them is increasing. This course will provide the student with the fundamentals of hazardous substances and wastes in relation to chemistry, environmental chemical processes, and toxicology. It is designed for students who are interested in various aspects of hazardous substances and wastes, including regulation, treatment, remediation, biological effects, chemical phenomena, transport, source reduction, and research. Experimental exercises will be integrated throughout the course to reinforce lecture topics. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required. ).
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 251 with lab or SCI 265 with lab or permission of instructor

This course provides an in-depth understanding of global changes of atmosphere, biosphere and hydrosphere in the past and present. using the state of art isotope technology and its applications in environmental sciences, the course covers both theoretical and experimental aspects of issues in global scale. The course integrates hands-on laboratory exercises to reinforce lecture topics. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 251 or SCI 265 or permission of the instructor

This course is intended to provide an extensive background in virology and immunology as well as a brief introduction to the progression of disease. This will allow for a greater understanding of the field of pharmacology which is centered around how pharmaceutical drugs work within the body, and is based on scientific discoveries being translated into product development. Several key pharmaceutical companies will also be analyzed in order to provide a real world understanding of the integration of business science. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 251 and Lab or SCI 265 and Lab; or permission of instructor

This seminar course will focus on current issues in biological science, and will vary from year to year based upon compelling new trends in the biosciences. Public understanding of science often plays a large role in the advancement of the field as a whole, and therefore current societal issues and biomedical research will be addressed. Additional topics may include addressing new technology or research methodologies, the role of government and culture in scientific achievement, the integration of the environment and science and climate change and species extinction. This course will be a faculty and student-run seminar course in which students will be required to present topics of interest to them. Outside speakers will be included.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 251 or SCI 262 or SCI 364; junior standing or permission of the instructior

This course provides an in-depth understanding of major plant groups--their naming, classification, structure, function and evolution. By examining all aspects of plant life through temporal and spatial changes, and the role of plants in shaping, adapting, and recording ancient and modern environments, the evolutionary history of plants and the global environmental change history will be integrated. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level science course

This course provides an understanding of current environmental problems and a familiarity with innovative developments to solve them. Current issues from the following subject areas will be discussed: climate change, energy, land degradation, air and water quality, population growth, resource depletion, and wildlife management. Guest speakers will describe their work and provide insight on specific environmental issues and the future of the environmental science field. Students will research proposed solutions to various current environmental problems and evaluate their potential effectiveness. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: Two of the following: SCI 251 and lab; SCI 264 and lab; SCI 265 and lab; and Junior standing or permission of instructor

This course provides an in-depth understanding of state-of-the-art isotope technologies and their applications in the environmental sciences. Both theoretical and experimental aspects will be examined, with emphasis on current issues surrounding compound-specific isotope geochemistry, and how these isotope techniques are used in different scientific disciplines and their impact on a student's future environmental career will also be emphasized. Additionally, the course will explore how technical skills and knowledge about isotope chemistry can be utilized in different environmental assessments. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200 level science course

Chemical processes provide valuable products and materials in various industries ranging from health care to transportation and food processing, yet they generate substantial quantities of wastes and emissions, which cost tens of millions of dollars annually to safely manage. This course investigates cost-effective utilization of chemical processes in ways that minimize pollution at the source and reduce impact on health and the environment, by creating sustainable systems in manufacturing, transportation, building, and energy production. Environmental risk-based costs and benefits are also explored, including the rationale, benefits, and implementation problems of green technology innovations. Experimental exercises will be integrated into the course to reinforce lecture topics. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: One of the following courses: SCI 251, SCI 351, SCI 356, SCI 362 or SCI 377, and junior standing or permission of the instructor

This course will explore the unique global health challenges we are facing today. As the world becomes increasingly globalized, the status of health worldwide has begun to decline. This course will present some of the complexities facing the global health community from a variety of perspectives. A brief history of global health will be given, with particular attention to environmental degradation, especially the correlation between these changes and adverse effects of health and disease transmission. Social issues including literacy and cultural values will also be discussed in relation to effects on health. Selected communicable diseases and zoonotic and emerging diseases will be highlighted, along with current efforts to stop the spread of these diseases within the global community. Selected epidemiological studies will be emphasized to ensure that students are able to comprehend and appraise research in this field. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 251 or SCI 366 or SCI 377 or permission of instructor

This course will provide a broad introduction to the rapidly advancing study of immunity and disease. Starting with a survey of basic immunological principles, the course will explore the importance of the molecular and cellular factors involved in immune responses. Key methodologies used by immunologists and the practical applications of this research for the medical community will be discussed, causes of autoimmune disorders.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: Junior standing

This course provides an introduction to programming in Python specifically designed for use in the sciences. Students will obtain hands-on experience in data analysis, simulation, and visualization in a project-based course. Fundamentals of programming in Python will be covered, and applied to problems in biology, environmental science, physics, and chemistry.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: At least one science course and one China- related course or permission of the instructor and junior standing

This course provides basic scientific information behind environmental issues in the larger context of cross-cultural differences between the U.S. and other countries. Using China as an example, this course offers an in-depth look into the environmental challenges that the country is facing with an emphasis on current environmental issues. Students will learn how to assess scientific data behind environmental debates and will examine how environmental issues are connected to society and business.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: SCI 390 and senior standing or permission of the department chair.

This course is designed to refine the research interests of departmental majors, and to gain additional hands-on research skills, including experimental design, methodology, and exposure to technology and instrumentation appropriate for a more extensive research project. Direct interaction of faculty and students will be required, and students will be matched with a faculty member most closely aligned with his/her research interests. The end product of this study will be a scientific paper describing a literature search, precise methodology, data analysis, and discussion of the research. An oral presentation of the research results will be expected, and the paper will be evaluated for publication in an appropriate journal.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: approval of supervising faculty member and department chair.

This course is tailored to fit the unique interests of a student interested in science. Faculty and student will design a program for the study of complex issues of science and/or technology, including technical applications of scientific methodology and basic applied research into existing scientific problems, including regular meetings throughout the semester. The end product of this study would be a paper describing the results of the investigation, including methodology and data that have been generated, or the equivalent.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: Honors Program and 200-level science course.

The human brain is very good at recognizing patterns. We are able to learn new faces and languages, and are able to work in complex environments easily. Brain models have been able to capture some of these features, and are continually giving us a better understanding of the workings of the brain. In this course we look at applications of these models on non-biological problems. For example, Google uses brain modeling techniques in some of its data analysis, and neural networks are used in automobiles and factories. Netflix has an ongoing contest to improve their ratings system, the winners of previous contests have used models inspired from the brain. This course will explore these, and other, applications of these models in data analysis problems in finance, marketing, science, economics, and other fields.
3 Credit Hours

This laboratory course is intended to complement the General Biology lecture course. Familiarity with a variety of organisms, techniques, and concepts is obtained through a direct, hands-on approach.
1 Credit Hour

Prerequisites: SCI 251 and SCI L251

This course is intended as a higher level biology laboratory course, and will be essential for students intending to pursue advanced graduate or professional training in biomedical fields. Building on the foundations of biological science covered in General Biology – SCI 251 and Biology II – SCI 253, this laboratory course will use evolutionary theory as an organizing theme to explore biodiversity, animal and plant biology, human anatomy and physiology, immunology, hormone regulation, and vaccine development .
1 Credit Hour

This laboratory course complements Physical Geology. Familiarity with minerals, igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks will be gained through hands-on activities. Other exercises include plotting of earthquake epicenters and map reading.
1 Credit Hour

This laboratory course consists of a series of exercises and term projects designed to give the student an appreciation of the heavens and modern developments in astronomical science. The exercises will duplicate as closely as possible the research conducted by contemporary astronomers, using real data and similar types of analyses. A trip to an observatory is included in the course.
1 Credit Hour

This laboratory course is designed to provide a better understanding of the physical principles studies in the lecture course. The work done here provides an opportunity to become familiar with the scientific methods of making experimental measurements and evaluating the results of these measurements.
1 Credit Hour

Laboratory experimentation is the foundation of the science of chemistry. The "hands-on" experiments performed in this course will illustrate the principles, theories, and laws discussed in the lecture portion of the course.
1 Credit Hour

This course completes a two (2) semester introductory chemistry sequence (lecture plus lab), and will enhance a student's preparation for further study in the environmental and life sciences at Bryant. Recommended for Science and Technology majors/concentrators, and who plan to enter an industry or field of study where a general knowledge of chemistry is essential, such as the health professions (medical, pharmaceutical, dental) and graduate school in the biological sciences. This laboratory course will present practical applications of inorganic chemistry, thermodynamics, kinetics, and spectroscopy, and will coincide with the Chemistry II lecture.
1 Credit Hour

This laboratory course consists of a series of exercises and term projects designed to give the student a quantitative understanding of experimental biological physics. The course follows Socratic methodology wherever possible to allow the students to gain a strong intuition even for concepts that are challenging. Data analysis techniques will be covered, as well as the use of technology in the gathering and interpretation of issues related to biological physics.
1 Credit Hour

In this lab course students will gain a hands-on understanding of the methods used in the prediction, modeling, and impact of weather-related natural disasters. Data analysis techniques will be covered, as well as the use of technology in the gathering and interpretation of issues related to natural disasters. The lab will focus on data measurement and uncertainty, and will also include a covering of climate models, their uses and limitations.
1 Credit Hour

This laboratory complements the Ecology: Theory and Applications lecture course. Ecosystem dynamics, including assessment of biotic and abiotic components, population growth patterns, species diversity and perturbation responses will be emphasized. Techniques and equipment commonly employed by professional ecologists will be stressed, using field studies, laboratory investigations, computer simulation, lab demonstrations, and site visits.
1 Credit Hour

This laboratory course complements Energy Management Strategies. Familiarity with a variety of non-renewable and renewable resources will be gained through hands-on activities. Exercises include evaluation of fossil fuel efficiency, computer simulations of resource allocation, and the design of a solar house.
1 Credit Hour

This laboratory course will provide a hands-on approach to examine topics such as genes and genomes, genetic manipulation, microbial biotechnology, plant and animal biotechnology, forensics, medical and environmental biotechnology to accompany the material covered in the Introduction to Biotechnology course. Students will gain a greater knowledge of the techniques currently used researchers in the biotech field.
1 Credit Hour

This laboratory component of Anatomy and Physiology I course will enable students to become familiar with anatomical structures at their own pace, using a hands-on approach. The laboratory exercises will include studies of 3-dimensional models and prepared slides, dissections of isolated organ systems, and observation of a virtual cadaver dissection, which will enable students to examine detailed structural features of key organs and systems, and better appreciate how the various body systems integrate. This course may only be taken concurrently with the lecture course or in a subsequent semester to the lecture course: fulfills the laboratory requirement.
1 Credit Hour

This laboratory course accompanies the Genetics lecture course which is intended to provide the fundamental basics of inheritance as well as to integrate modern uses of genetics in biotechnology and genomics. Topics will include basic inheritance patterns, reproduction, chromosomal replication, and the role of genetics in the development of various diseases. Students will be able to track inheritance patterns to determine risk of the occurrence of disease using hands-on techniques such as genetic karyotyping, generation of Punnett squares and DNA fingerprinting analyses.
1 Credit Hour

This laboratory course will accompany the Organic Chemistry lecture course. Laboratory activities are based primarily on the study of carbon-containing compounds. Students will be given the opportunity to carry out reactions covered in the lecture course. In addition, the basic techniques required for performing organic chemistry research will also be learned, utilizing state of the art equipment, and the importance of organic chemistry to biology and environmental science will be emphasized.
1 Credit Hour

This advanced laboratory course investigates a number of environmental topics pertaining to land and life. Interactive activities and experiments convey basic concepts of data collection, experimental design, analytical instrumentation, data analysis and interpretation, and risk assessment. These laboratory exercises also provide the necessary laboratory skills and techniques to conduct scientific research.
1 Credit Hour

This advanced laboratory course investigates a number of environmental topics pertaining to air and water. Interactive activities and experiments convey basic concepts of data collection, experimental design, analytical instrumentation, data analysis and interpretation, and risk assessment. These laboratory exercises also provide the necessary laboratory skills and techniques to conduct scientific research.
1 Credit Hour

SCI L373 is the laboratory portion of artificial intelligence and robotics. This lab must be taken concurrently with the lecture portion.
1 Credit Hour

Prerequisites: SCI L365

This laboratory course is the second in a two-semester organic chemistry progression. This course will use a self-directed curriculum to teach and reinforce topics and concepts in organic chemistry and build critical thinking skills. This course will employ microwave assisted organic synthesis, collaborative experimental design, analysis and debriefing of results. This course may only be taken concurrently with the lecture course or in a subsequent semester to the lecture course; fulfills the laboratory requirement.
1 Credit Hour

This laboratory will accompany the GIS for Environmental Decision Making course, which is designed to provide an overview of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), widely used by geologists, hydrologists, oceanographers, community planners and environmental engineers, utilizing diverse computer hardware and software applications. The lab will utilize GIS hardware and software to examine problems and challenges confronted by environmental decision makers, including land use planning, facility citing, resource management, conservation strategies, public health issues, and transportation planning. This course will consider how GIS applications are structured, what types of mapping data can be processed, and what customized products can be generated.
1 Credit Hour

This laboratory course accompanies the Microbiology lecture course, which examines life at the microscopic level and is designed to provide an understanding of microbiology and its connectedness to the environment, medicine, agriculture, and industry. Topics will include exploration of the world of bacteria, viruses, protista, and fungi, preservation and safety; the role of microbes in biotechnology, industry, and agriculture, antibiotic resistance, viral and bacterial diseases of humans, and the use of microbes or microbial products in bioterrorism.
1 Credit Hour

This laboratory component of Anatomy and Physiology II course will serve as a continuance of Anatomy and Physiology I Lab, which will enable students to study in more depth the various human body systems. The laboratory exercises will include studies of 3-dimensional models and prepared slides, dissections of isolated organ systems, and observation of a virtual cadaver dissection, which will enable students to examine detailed structural features of key organs and systems, and better appreciate how the various body systems integrate.
1 Credit Hour

Prerequisites: SCI 251 or permission of the instructor

This course prepares individuals to function in the pre-hospital environment. This course provides instruction in basic life support care of sick and injured persons, including airway assessment, shock management, communications, documentation general pharmacology for the basic provider, hemorrhage control, ambulance operations, and splinting of adult, pediatric and infant patients, as well as special care of patients exposed to heat, cold, radiation, hazardous materials, poisons or contagious disease. This course consists of didactic and laboratory class time as well as clinical training in the hospital setting and training aboard an ambulance. Completion of this course qualifies the student to be eligible to sit for the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technician’s exam. This course may include one or two Saturday sessions.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: 200-level science course

Yearly CycleWe continue to pollute air and water, degrade soil and threaten wildlife. This course describes the thought process and necessary analytical steps to remediate outdoor environmental problems, such as contaminated air and water, wetland degradation, endangered species, and indoor environmental challenges resulting from asbestos, lead paint, and toxic molds. Field trips to superfund sites, wildlife sanctuaries, government laboratories, and environmental advocacy organizations, along with guest speakers from government, corporate, NGOs, and the environmental consulting industry will prepare students for completing a semester-long “environmental consulting” project that will demonstrate the progression of investigation and remediation activities through field sampling, laboratory analysis using advanced scientific instrumentation, data interpretation, and mitigation recommendations.
3 Credit Hours

Graduate Courses

This course will address how biological characters and concepts are illustrated through various kinks of imaging technologies. Using plants as examples, morphological and anatomical characters at both macro- and micro- levels will be illustrated and interpreted through various imaging technologies, and their biological and environmental significance will be also discussed. This course will provide you with a basic overview of imaging technologies and their applications in the biological sciences, particularly in relation to scientific publications and reports. Emphasis will be placed on hands-on practice of these technologies, resulting in a portfolio of completed projects. Students will be grouped to complete final products generating publishable biological imaging on research samples. This is a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

This course will cover the principles behind a variety of instrumental analytical techniques that are in use in the environmental and life sciences. The principles behind techniques such as gas chromatography (GC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), mass spectrometry (MS), infrared and UV spectroscopy, and high performance liquid chromatography will be discussed. These topics will be explored in relation to their utility in answering scientific problems in the environmental and life sciences. Students will develop a theoretical knowledge of the principles of various chemical analysis instrumentation and how it can be applied to environmental and biological problems. This is a 500 level graduate course and permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

This course will explore the challenges of providing a sustainable energy supply to support increasing world population and growing economies, and will focus on global energy systems, renewable energy sources, distributed power networks, diversification of energy supply, and increased energy efficiency. By examining the energy issues that preoccupy world decision makers, such as dwindling fuel resources, deteriorating electrical grids, externalization of costs, subsidies for existing energy corporations, extreme pollution and environmental degradation associated with mining, drilling, transport, operations, and waste disposal, students will develop an international perspective and multidisciplinary frame with which to approach needed changes in direction. Innovative approaches are needed throughout the entire energy distribution system, including changes in fuel procurement, processing, usage, and cost analyses that account for the entire fuel cycle and minimization of external costs. Breakthroughs in control systems, materials management, green building technology, carbon sequestration techniques, and algal biofuel production are just a few examples of promising new avenues for energy developments that will be assessed. This is a 500 level graduate course and permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

This course provides background and training in the utilization of Geographic Information System (GIS) tools for tracking climate change effects on coastal ecosystems, with a particular emphasis on how coastal planners can predict the extent and likelihood of significant alteration of coastline geomorphonology or ecosystem dynamics. Advance planning can reduce the impact of these chagnes on residents and natural inhabitants. Case studies of coastal regions around the world will be explored. This is a 500 level graduate course.
3 Credit Hours

As one of the major environmental issues, conservation captures the attention of both scientists and the general public. National parks in the U.S. and China preserve spectacular examples of the best biological and geological resources on our planet. This course provides basic scientific information behind these natural wonders and presents and analyzes conservation issues using an interdisciplinary approach. Through reading, discussion, and lectures, students will gain insights into the critical role that national parks play in the preservation of natural resources, as well as protecting cultural and historic values. Using selected national parks as case examples, students will learn how to assess scientific data underlying environmental debates and will examine how these issues are connected to society and business. This is a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
S

This course will present an overview of environmental policy alternatives, emphasizing the interrelationship of science, business, and government in policy formation and implementation. Global issues will be included, with special attention directed toward international efforts to achieve consensus on sustainable growth policies that encompass economic realities, technological innovation and a sensible legal and regulatory framework. This is a 500 level graduate course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

The generation of hazardous wastes and our potential exposure to them is increasing. This course will provide the student with the fundamentals of hazardous substances and wastes in relation to chemistry, environmental chemical processes, and toxicology. It is designed for students who are interested in various aspects of hazardous substances and wastes, including regulation, treatment, remediation, biological effects, chemical phenomena, transport, source reduction, and research. Experimental exercises will be integrated throughout the course to reinforce lecture topics. This is a 500 level graduate course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

The course provides an in-depth understanding of global changes in the atmosphere, biosphere, and hydrosphere in the past and present. Using both geological and biological records, the course examines the evidence that depicts the environmental impacts of global changes, especially climate changes. Using molecular isotope technology and its research applications in the environmental sciences, the course covers both theoretical and experimental aspects of issues at the global scale. Current issues in geological, paleobiological, and organic geochemical applications will be examined, with a focus on global changes and how isotope techniques are used in different scientific disciplines to characterize and quantify these patterns. This is a 500 level graduate course and permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

This course is intended to provide an advanced introduction and coherent overview of pharmaceutical science concepts for students interested in pharmaceutical and medical science, including the fundamental principles that underlie all disciplines in the pharmaceutical sciences, along with an understanding of the field of pharmacology and the process by which laboratory research findings are transformed into usable products. This is a 500 level graduate course. Instructor permission maybe required.
3 Credit Hours

Complex systems are characterized by a large number of locally-interacting parts which exhibit behavior qualitatively different from the individual parts. Such systems are best explored numerically, because analytical solutions are often lacking. In this course students will explore many such systems, from meteorology and climate, to ecology, economic and neural systems. In the global environment, there is a growing need for comprehending complex systems found at the border between order and chaos, in contexts of environment and society. Modeling exercises will be integrated throughout the course to reinforce lecture topics. This is a 500 level graduate course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

This course addresses the origin and diversity of plants and their key role in shaping ancient and modern environments. Plants are the main "producers" in the Earth's ecosystems and are the major proxy for studies of environmental change. The course will provide detail about the major plant groups, and an in-depth understanding of the origin, evolution, and diversification of these groups. Through examining the change of global vegetation through temporal and spatial transitions, and the role of plants in shaping, adapting, and recording ancient and modern environments, the co-evolution between plants and global environment will be covered. This is a 500 level graduate course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

This course provides an understanding of current environmental problems and a familiarity with innovative developments to solve them. Current issues from the following subject areas will be discussed: climate change, energy, land degradation, air and water quality, population growth, resource depletion, and wildlife management. Guest speakers will describe their work and provide insight on specific environmental issues and the future of the environmental science field. Students will research proposed solutions to various current environmental problems and evaluate the potential effectiveness of their approaches. This is a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

This course provides an in-depth understanding of state-of-the-art isotope technologies and their applications in the environmental sciences. Both theoretical and experimental aspects will be examined, with an emphasis on current issues surrounding compound- specific isotope geochemistry, and how these isotope techniques are used in different scientific disciplines and their impact on a student's future environmental career also will be emphasized. Additionally, the course will explore how technical skills and knowledge about isotope chemistry can be utilized in different environmental assessments. This is a 500 level graduate course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: One 200-level and one 300-level course in environmental science or permission of the instructor and junior standing. This is a 500 level graduate course and permission of the instructor is required.

Chemical Processes provide valuable products and materials in various industries ranging from health care to transportation and food processing, yet they generate substantial quantities of wastes and emissions, which cost tens of millions of dollars annually to safely manage. This course investigates cost-effective utilization of chemical processes in ways that minimize pollution at the source and reduce impact on health and the environment, by creating sustainable systems in manufacturing, transportation, building, and energy production. Environmental risk-based costs and benefits are also explored, including the rationale, benefits, and implementation problems of green technology innovations. Experimental exercises will be integrated into the course to reinforce lecture topics.
3 Credit Hours

This course will explore the unique global health challenges we are facing today. As the world becomes increasingly globalized, the status of health worldwide has begun to decline. This course will present some of the complexities facing the global health community from a variety of perspectives. A brief history of global health will be given, with particular attention to environmental degradation, especially the correlation between these changes and adverse effects on health and disease transmission. Social issues including literacy and cultural values will also be discussed in relation to effects on health. Selected communicable diseases and zoonotic and emerging diseases will be highlighted, along with current efforts to stop the spread of these diseases within the global community. Selected epidemiological studies will be emphasized to ensure that students are able to comprehend and appraise research in this field. This is a 500 level graduate content course.
3 Credit Hours

This course will provide a broad introduction to the rapidly advancing study of immunity and disease. Starting with a survey of basic immunological principles, the course will explore the importance of the molecular and cellular factors involved in immune responses. Key methodologies used by immunologists and the practical applications of this research for the medical community will be discussed, including the role of immunity in cancer treatment and the causes of autoimmune disorders. This is a 500 level graduate course and permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours

This course is intended to assist graduate students in designing research experiments, identifying technology and instrumentation necessary to support the experimentation, conducting and verifying initial pilot studies, and exploring possible funding sources. The course will culminate in the submission of the graduate student's proposal for graduate research project to his/her thesis committee, along with a summary of equipment and supply needs to support the research project.
3 Credit Hours

This course is intended for graduate students carrying out thesis research, in conjunction with the Master of Global Environmental Studies, under the guidance of the Thesis Committee. This is the first part, 3 credits, toward the 6 credit hour thesis research requirement. During the course of both courses students will complete the laboratory experiments, analyze experimental data and findings, prepare and submit the thesis, and complete the oral defense.
3 Credit Hours

This course is intended for graduate students carrying out thesis research, in conjunction with the Master of Science in Global Environmental Studies, under the guidance of the Thesis Committee. This is the second part, 3 credit hours, toward the 6 credit hour research requirement. During the course of both courses, students will complete the laboratory experiments, analyze experimental data and findings, prepare and submit the Thesis, and complete the oral defense.
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: Student must have completed six hours of graduate coursework in Global Environmental Studies before taking the Graduate Practicum.

Graduate education is enhanced by practical application of its learned material. Thus, this course is designed to provide practical experience in some setting, scholarly or professional, related to global environmental studies. That experience can be in either a for-profit or a not-for-profit organization. The Practicum is intended to provide the student with an opportunity to acquire in-field knowledge and experience. Because academic credit is awarded for this experience, the student must gain academic knowledge as well as practical experience. The Graduate Practicum must be approved by the instructor, the MSGES program director, and the department chair.
3 Credit Hours

This course permits the student to pursue an area of interest and relevancy in global environmental studies and/or sustainability. The work will be performed under the supervision of a faculty member who will help design the program of study and the requirements to be met by the student. All directed studies must be approved by the Graduate Director and the Chair of the Department, who will be supplied with a title for and description of the course, its requirements and grading criteria, and a preliminary list of readings. This course is a 600-level graduate course. Permission of the instructor is required.
3 Credit Hours