Faculty Profile - 460x460 - Psychology - Kristin Scaplen

Kristin Scaplen

Kristin Scaplen, Assistant Professor, grew up in Connecticut, not far from the Rhode Island border and has lived in New England for much of her life. She received a B.S. in Biology and a B.S. in Psychology from the University of Connecticut and her PhD in Neuroscience from Brown University. Prior to coming to Bryant, she spent her postdoc using sophisticated neurogenetic tools to study the persistence of memory in the context of alcohol use. She intends to continue investigating how neural circuits for pathologic memories are established and change with experience to ultimately guide maladaptive reward seeking.

Ph D, Brown University

B Sc, University of Connecticut

B Sc, University of Connecticut

Scaplen, K. M.,Kaun, K. R., Reward from bugs to bipeds: a comparative approach to understanding how reward circuits function, Journal of Neurogenetics/Taylor & Francis.

Scaplen, K. M.,Talay, M.,Nuñez, K. M.,Salamon, S.,Waterman, A. G.,Gang, S.,Song, S. L.,Barnea, G.,Kaun, K. R., Circuits that encode and guide alcohol-associated preference, eLife, 2020.

Scaplen, K. M.,Mei, N. J.,Bounds, H. A.,Song, S. L.,Azanchi, R.,Kaun, K. R., Automated real-time quantification of group locomotor activity in Drosophila melanogaster, Scientific Reports/Nature, 2019.

Scaplen, K. M.,Agster, K. L.,Burwell, R. D., Anatomy of the Hippocampus and the Declarative Memory System, Academic Press/Elsevier, 2016.

Neuroscience, Psychology, Learning and Memory, Sensation and Perception, Neurogenetics

I have a long-standing interest in understanding neural circuitry mechanisms underlying learning and memory across species. I currently use a multidisciplinary approach to investigate the mechanisms of learning and memory and understand how they are disrupted by drugs of abuse or other maladaptive conditions. The focus of my work is to understand how neural circuits for pathologic memories are established and change with experience to ultimately guide maladaptive reward seeking. My long-term research goal is to capitalize on the <i>Drosophila </i>model to reveal general circuitry principles for how circuits function and change with experience in adaptive and maladaptive models to better understand how local circuits function in the broader context of the mammalian brain.<br>

Genetics Society of America

Pavlovian Society

International Behavioral and Neural Genetics Society

Brown University Chapter of Sigma Xi

Society for Neuroscience